Teige P. Sheehan is a patent attorney with particular expertise in the life sciences, biotechnology, and pharmaceuticals, and experience in related areas such as medical devices and nanotechnology. His work encompasses intellectual property litigation and appeals, post-grant proceedings and reexamination, and drafting and prosecuting patent and trademark applications. Accordingly, he also engages in client counseling attendant to these services, such as assessing inventions’ patentability and freedom to operate, validity of patents and their infringement, and marks’ registrability, as well as other issues related to obtaining and protecting intellectual property rights and unfair competition in general.

Teige received a Presidential Scholarship from Boston College, where he received his Bachelor’s degree, was named Scholar of the College, and was awarded membership in Phi Beta Kappa, and continued his studies there to receive his doctoral degree. Subsequently, he was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship at the Yale University School of Medicine, where he studied intracellular signaling mechanisms, regulation of genome expression, and morphological aspects of neural plasticity responsible for the adaptations seen following chronic exposure to stress, antidepressant drugs, and drugs of abuse. Before attending law school, Teige was an assistant professor at Brown University, directing a research laboratory where he continued such work. He authored numerous peer-reviewed research papers, review articles, and book chapters throughout his career as a research scientist.

He received his J.D. from Albany Law School, where he graduated summa cum laude. He also served on the editorial board of the Albany Law Review, where he published an article on the applicability of “safe harbor” provisions in the Patent Act to complaints brought before the International Trade Commission. Teige was awarded the Hon. Frederick J. Scullin, Jr. Scholarship by the Northern District of New York Federal Court Bar Association and was named a Law Fellow of the New York State Bar Association Intellectual Property Law Section. Following law school, he served a judicial clerkship with the New York State Supreme Court Appellate Division, Third Department.

Bar Admissions and Professional Affiliations:

Teige is admitted to the bars of New York State, the United States District Court for the Northern District of New York, and the United States Courts of Appeals for the Second and Federal Circuits, and is registered to practice before the United States Patent & Trademark Office.

He serves on the Executive Committees of the Intellectual Property Law Section and the Young Lawyers Section, and on the Committee on Courts of Appellate Jurisdiction, of the New York State Bar Association.

Court asked to correct course on patent eligibility, The Daily Record, September 15, 2015

The Continuing Evolution of Patent Eligibility Under 35 U.S.C. § 101, Reprinted with permission from: Bright Ideas, Winter 2014, Vol. 23, No. 3, published by the New York State Bar Association, One Elk Street, Albany, New York 12207, (1-800-582-2452) http://www.nysba.org.

The Supreme Court Holds Genes Are Patent-Ineligible Products of Nature, Reprinted with permission from: Bright Ideas, Fall 2013, Vol. 22, No. 2, published by the New York State Bar Association, One Elk Street, Albany, New York 12207, (1-800-582-2452) http://www.nysba.org.

Mayo v. Prometheus: The Overlap Between Patent Eligibility and Patentability, Reprinted with the permission from: Bright Ideas, Fall 2012, Vol. 21, No. 2, published by the New York State Bar Association, One Elk Street, Albany, NY, 12207, (1-800-582-2452) http://www.nysba.org.

Federal Circuit Raises the Bar for Finding Inequitable Conduct, Reprinted with the permission from: Bright Ideas. Fall 2011, Vol. 20, No. 2, published by the New York State Bar Association, One Elk Street, Albany, NY, 12207, (1-800-582-2452) http://www.nysba.org.

The Ethical Quandary of Pretext Investigations in Intellectual Property Practice and Beyond, Reprinted with the permission from: Bright Ideas. Winter 2010, Vol. 19, No. 3, published by the New York State Bar Association, One Elk Street, Albany, NY, 12207, (1-800-582-2452) http://www.nysba.org.

A Safe Harbor for Drugs Made Offshore: The Federal Circuit Renders the Bolar Amendment Available in Section 337 Actions in Amgen v. U.S. International Trade Commission: Albany Law Review, December 18, 2009, Vol. 73.1.

The Federal Circuit Denies the Patentability of Genes When Cloning is Obvious to Try and Successful Results Are Predictable, Intellectual Property Law Bulletin, (Heslin Rothenberg Farley & Mesiti, Albany, N.Y.), Summer 2009.